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25 March 2006 @ 08:34 pm
Bust gussets... how do you draft them?  
I have a customer that wants a midbust corset. She has a nice natural hourglass figure, but what is giving me issues is the fact that she is an E to an F cup. The way that I usually draft my patterns doesn't really allow for that much of a change between the bust/underbust/waist measurements. there is a full six inch difference between her bust and underbust measurements and 9 inches difference between bust and waist, and that is before waist reduction is factored in.

So, I believe gussets would work best for her, but I am completely confused on how to draft them. I want the gussets to attach at a seam because the corset will be made out of PVC and I will not be able to use flossing.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Drawings and diagrams would be great too... I know I am asking a lot, but hey... never know if you don't ask, right?

Thank you all in advance,

Hahns
 
 
Current Mood: curiouscurious
 
 
 
I want to show you what the stars are made of.cherryheavy on March 26th, 2006 05:57 am (UTC)
Personally, I have found that with super large differences in ribcage/bust, that gussets leave the garment with too little shape in the top.

Have you considered a very rounded cup finish?
avid_stumbleravid_stumbler on March 26th, 2006 06:32 am (UTC)
Hmmmm... thanks for the input. I always thought gussets gave more definition in the cup... maybe in how they are drafted??

I will just have to experiment with it, and see.

Hahns
Alicedragonwort on March 27th, 2006 07:48 pm (UTC)
make them more petal shape than trangle shape. that will help for one. But just making the cup portion very rounded can at times look better than gussets because the gusset draws alot of attention to the bust.
avid_stumbler: faceavid_stumbler on March 26th, 2006 06:35 am (UTC)
Was just looking at your user info and noticed that you are in Portland. I didn't realize you were that close. I live just outside of Salem. Many of my customers are out of Portland.

(no subject) - cherryheavy on March 27th, 2006 01:27 am (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - avid_stumbler on March 27th, 2006 01:39 am (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - cherryheavy on March 27th, 2006 05:15 am (UTC) (Expand)
Laralaracorsets on March 26th, 2006 05:47 pm (UTC)
It all depends on how you shape the gussets. Strait cut triangles like many people do just flatten and push up. If you round them with a natural curve they can be beautifully rounded, very flattering and supportive.
(no subject) - avid_stumbler on March 26th, 2006 05:56 pm (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - laracorsets on March 26th, 2006 06:56 pm (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - avid_stumbler on March 26th, 2006 07:00 pm (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - laracorsets on March 26th, 2006 07:07 pm (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - laracorsets on March 26th, 2006 07:02 pm (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - avid_stumbler on March 26th, 2006 07:05 pm (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - laracorsets on March 26th, 2006 07:08 pm (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - laracorsets on March 26th, 2006 07:12 pm (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - avid_stumbler on March 26th, 2006 07:18 pm (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - laracorsets on March 26th, 2006 07:42 pm (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - djonma on March 30th, 2007 06:41 pm (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - avid_stumbler on March 30th, 2007 07:00 pm (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - djonma on March 30th, 2007 07:04 pm (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - laracorsets on March 30th, 2007 07:31 pm (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - lc_corsetry on March 26th, 2006 07:22 pm (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - vesperi on March 27th, 2006 03:00 am (UTC) (Expand)
ninth_mythninth_myth on March 26th, 2006 02:07 pm (UTC)
i'm a c cup but my measurment differences are almost the same. i've never had a corset with gussets and unless you were looking for a cup effect, i've never had issues with shaping.
mrpet: curiousmrpet on March 26th, 2006 04:14 pm (UTC)
I have drafted gussets for as large of a cup as a J cup. It's a little hard to explain but you can see that PVC corset here.. I ended up splitting the gusset down the middle to make two to give more shaping to the cup.

I sew the gusset to the first panel and the resulting assembly is sewn to the next panel. The two seam allowances (1st assembly, second pannel) match up as close as I can get them. This second seam needs to be just outside of the bust and the bone there will give side support.
electradesignselectradesigns on March 26th, 2006 09:29 pm (UTC)
This is how I do it.

Drawing by Electra Designs. All rights reserved.
This is the method I made up. There are probably better ways to do it, but this is how i make bust gussets.
The orange lines are grain lines.
The red lines show what changes I make at each step.
Make sure you are working with no seam allowances. Add those at the end.
First draft an overbust pattern with shaped princess seamed cups. Come as close to the finished bust size as possible, but you will add more width in each gusset later, so it doesn't have to be perfect. The underbust has to be correct though,
Draw lines where you will cut off the bust curves. Cut them off. This is where your gusset will go later. You will use the bust curves to create the gussets.
Flip the bust shapes so they look like the heart in the middle. In other words, turn the pieces over, and connect them on along, placing the points together. Notice they are connected in reverse, so the princess seams do not meet. They are now on the outside.
Connect the bust shapes with a smooth arc across the top. Move the grain line to the center of the piece.
Place the gusset where it used to be, matching the point at the underbust line, and use your awl to walk the seam lines. Depending on the shape of the bust, you may wish to change the shape of the panels, or the gusset. Draw in notches, and make sure the seam lines match.
Add seam allowances, make a mockup and test the fit. make adjustments. To make the gusset bigger, slash along the grain line leaving a tiny hinge at the point on the bottom. Spread it open to create extra room for the boobie. tape it onto another piece of paper, and smooth the top line. To make the gusset smaller, slash it, and instead of spreading it, overlap the cut edges at along the grain line. tape together. tape to a new piece of paper. Smooth the top edge.
You can add contour and volume to the shape of the gusset by rounding the seams. Just be sure to walt the seams so they match the seams on the corset panels.
I hope this helps.
electradesignselectradesigns on March 26th, 2006 09:34 pm (UTC)
Re: This is how I do it.
In other words, turn the pieces over, and connect them on along, placing the points together. Typo correction: Connect them along the seams, placing points together.
avid_stumbleravid_stumbler on March 26th, 2006 09:48 pm (UTC)
Re: This is how I do it.
Very cool. Thank you very much. I love the drawing, it is very helpful.

Hahns
electradesignselectradesigns on March 26th, 2006 10:22 pm (UTC)
Re: This is how I do it.
you're welcome. :)
Vesperivesperi on March 27th, 2006 03:04 am (UTC)
Re: This is how I do it.
why do you flip the bust pieces? i understand the measurement is the same, but the outside curve??
electradesignselectradesigns on March 27th, 2006 03:20 am (UTC)
Re: This is how I do it.
because if you don't the pieces are too rounded, and the line you draw to connect them till be too long, which means you will probably have a gusset that turns out too big. Unless your draft the bust small to begin with, in which case, you may need the extra room.
justtobeme2justtobeme2 on March 27th, 2006 05:29 pm (UTC)
Re: This is how I do it.
That is an awesome description. Thanks!
Can you tell me what program you use to draw those things? I want to do this spooler thing but I don't have an easy'ish program to do that. I was thinking of just taking pictures but I can't describe in pictures what I need to show because it's already made and I need to show step by step.
electradesignselectradesigns on March 28th, 2006 01:06 am (UTC)
Re: This is how I do it.
thanks . I use adobe illustrator