19 August 2014 @ 02:36 pm
Double boning a welt-seam corset  
I would like to start by saying that I'm new to the whole corset making thing, but hhave been sewing for six years. I like the look of double-boned seams but also want to use what someone called the "welt seam" method of construction. The corset I am making will be lined, so seam allowances showing on the inside will not be an issue. I understand that seam allowances should be pressed to one side for strength purposes.

What I was wondering is if anyone has tried sewing two scraps of fabric along the seamline and pressing those over in the opposite direction of the seam allowances to create a channel for the boning on the opposite side. I've included a drawn diagram (hoping it uploads properly) of what I am suggesting. It would then be top stitched in the exact same manner as the side with the actual seam allowances. I think it would make sure that (considering the layers involved) the stitch length and tension would be accurate for all channels. The boning would be inserted in the centre of each, allowing three layers of fabric on either side of the boning.

Would this work? Is it a good idea? Has anyone done it? Why, or why not?


 
 
Current Mood: contemplativecontemplative
 
 
 
( 8 comments — Leave a comment )
happybathappybat on August 19th, 2014 07:07 pm (UTC)
Hi! Can you make the picture a tiny bit smaller? It's doing funny things to my friends page.

Good luck with your corset!
ext_1790340 on August 19th, 2014 08:04 pm (UTC)
Is this better?
Sorry about that, I tried uploading it from my phone. Is this a better size?
happybathappybat on August 19th, 2014 09:15 pm (UTC)
Re: Is this better?
SO much better - thank you so much!
virginiadear: LaBellavirginiadear on August 19th, 2014 09:54 pm (UTC)
Assuming you're using a "strength layer" in there somewhere, this strikes me as a lot of bulk on the seams even before the boning is inserted. You've already tested this many layers of whatever you'll be using, to be sure your machine can handle what you're asking it to do?

Assuming there will be no problem with the machine stitching through all layers (however many those will be; grading the seam allowances can make a difference), will this not result in bulk a corset is intended to help reduce?

Can not you bone your strength layer on either side of the seams either by "lapping" the panels (one raw edge forward, one raw edge behind, matching the seam lines) which will require some stitching "in the round" as it were; then turning under the raw edges of the seam allowances and stitching them down to create the boning channels?
Or, simply sew the panels of the strength layer fabric right sides together, and turn under the seam allowances and stitch them down to create the boning channels?
And then, in either case, apply the fashion fabric, sewn together to make the outer layer of the corset, the pretty, feminine, sexy layer, over the outside of the working portion of the corset?

I'm probably not explaining this as clearly as either of us would like, although it's very clear in my head.

ext_1790340 on August 19th, 2014 11:12 pm (UTC)
Testing this method on muslin resulted in seams that were easily sewn and surprisingly flat, though I'm not sure how much bulk the boning will add as I'm still waiting for it and my actual fabric to arrive. The thickness of two layers of muslin was 1 mm, the seams sewn as diagrammed flattened to 2.5 mm after topstitching.

I understand what you mean by boning the strength layer only, and can visualize what you mean. Admittedly, lapping the seams never occurred to me. Have you done that before, and how well does it work? I would imagine it would take a lot of basting to be accurate.

Or, simply sew the panels of the strength layer fabric right sides together, and turn under the seam allowances and stitch them down to create the boning channels In order to create a double-boned seam, wouldn't this require pressing the seam allowances open? I'm pretty new to corset-making, but most of the things I've read say not to press open, as all the force involved in lacing could cause the thread to snap.
virginiadear: LaBellavirginiadear on August 19th, 2014 11:57 pm (UTC)
"Testing this method on muslin resulted in seams that were easily sewn and surprisingly flat, though I'm not sure how much bulk the boning will add as I'm still waiting for it and my actual fabric to arrive."

Muslin is a slim-line fabric, i.e., adds very little bulk to the silhouette.
I've been assuming that you're going to turn under the raw edges of the seam allowances and stitch them down. If you have the "fashion" or outermost, decorative layer in there, too, (and if you look at your diagram), you have two layers of fabric; then four layers of seam allowances before turning; eight layers of seam allowances after turning, assuming all layers are included in the turning; and ten layers of fabric through which to sew to make the boning channel.

If you're concerned about the strength of the seam, I suggest you make the corset out of the strength layer, either lapping the seams or pressing the seam allowances to one side and essentially flat-felling them Then, use a tape, or self-fabric tape, centered over the seam; stitch the tape in place "in the ditch" of the seam holding the two panels together; turn the raw edges under; stitch them down. Now you have your boning channels on both sides of the seam ("seams," when you've done this on each seam which has to be double-boned.

How much bulk the boning will add will depend to an extent on whether you're using flat steels or spiral steels.


"...lapping the seams ... Have you done that before, and how well does it work? I would imagine it would take a lot of basting to be accurate."
I have, and I like the results. Before boning, the seam is very much inclined to curve with the topography of the body. Because it's essentially felled twice and the stitching isn't holding two folded edges together, I think it is subjected to less strain (although I could be wrong about that.)
Until the boning begins to take a curve, the fabric kind of wants to ruck up along the steels.
Lapping seams does require either dead-on accuracy without basting, something at which I've never trusted myself, or carefully aligning the "upper layer" seam line (which ought to have been marked in something erasable or which will vanish somehow) and the "under layer" seam line.
If the strength layer is very thick or very firm, remember to allow for additional "turn of cloth" when you cut out the panels, because that will make a difference.

When I've done this, I've aligned the two seam allowances by pin-basting through with straight pins, going from the top layer through the lower layer, and then using another pin at right angles to the seam line (or rather, where it's going to be) to hold the two layers together.
It's slow going, but I work slowly and I'm used to this; I just accept it.
Then, I hand-baste the two layers together on either side of where the seam line is, fairly close to it.

Does this help?



Edited at 2014-08-20 06:51 am (UTC)
Annarabid_bookwyrm on August 21st, 2014 08:00 pm (UTC)
I agree with Virginiadear - this seems like a lot of fabric, probably much heavier and less biddable than muslin. I think you could get the same effect with much less weight by using separate boning channels, either applied inside over the seam allowances (showing only lines of stitching on the outside) or outside over seam allowances pressed out (obviating the need for a lining entirely). Sewn on the outside, they would look like strapping.

Benefits are, it reinforces the seam - you're applying a piece of fabric or tape across the seam and stitching it down on both sides - and if you use tape or ribbon rather than fabric, you don't have to deal with any raw edges. Even if you do, there's still less fabric there than in your sketch.

If you're really dedicated to the design you posted, definitely try it out with some scraps before moving on to the real thing.
Annarabid_bookwyrm on August 21st, 2014 08:01 pm (UTC)
Oh, also - I changed the tags on your post. Have a look through construction|seams, there may be something relevant in there.
( 8 comments — Leave a comment )